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150 Coal Plants Unplugged: 400 Million Tons of CO2 Prevented

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Glen H. said...

I have two important reasons to move America beyond coal: Jakob and Peyton, my sons. I want these terrific boys, and their children, to grow up in a country with clean energy, clean air, and clean water. They are looking to my generation to make this happen, and I'm going to be part of the team that does it. Little Rock, Arkansas
Stephanie C. said...

Simply put, coal is dirty and we don't need anymore of it here or anywhere. Overland Park, Kansas
Fran C. said...

It is important to me because the mountain in WV where I played as a kid is now a slurry pit. We were poor, everyone was poor in the '40s in the Appalachians but we had our mountains. Now we don't even have a tree but we do have memories.
Nachy K. said...

After college, I spent two years in the Middle East advocating and organizing for people's right to clean and sufficient water. When I came home to Ohio, I was shocked to discover the same, inter-linked social problems in the Appalachian corner of the state: widespread poverty, political disenfranchisement, and rapacious mineral extraction. It's one thing to know it's going on in the Middle East. It's another thing to know it's happening in your home state. Enough is enough - time to come through for those communities that have suffered for decades to feed our addiction to cheap, dirty energy. Columbus, Ohio
Susie and Brad M. said...

It is important to that America moves beyond coal. Coal is not only making climate change worse in the end it is a non-renewable resource. This is a problem that needs to be solved. We do not want to hand it off to our kids. Sheridan, Wyoming
Lane B. said...
 
Because I live near communities in Appalachia, and have seen how the choices of our nation impact these regions. If people understood better where their energy comes from, and the people their choices affect, it will make a big difference in moving our country to a cleaner, safer future. Lexington, Kentucky
Hadley D. said...

It is important to me to move America beyond cola becuase I want my grandchildren to grow up on an Earth that resembles the one I grew up on. Pacifica, California
Leslie M. said...

It is important for America to move beyond coal and embrace clean energy for a brighter future. We need to preserve our mountains, heal our asthmatic children and restore our clean air by using wind and solar power. Hillsboro, Oregon
David G. said...

To slow climate destruction. To breath cleaner air. To save the mining regions from destruction. Cincinnati, Ohio
Emily R. said...

We have to do it for our children. Thinking about what we want for future generations is exactly what perspective we should be looking through. Do we want a polluted unlivable planet, or clean air, and clean public spaces for our friends and families?
Joyce B., Peoria said...

Hundreds of thousands of prime flat farmland in Illinois will be devastated by longwall mining subsidence if we do not move beyond coal: it is already happening in the heartland of our nation's farm fields. Illinois
Andy B. said...

Working in the Southwest in helping shut down several coal mines and a coal plant, I know that the transition to a clean energy economy is possible. We need to evolve and move away from old forms of energy from coal and uranium and move our communities to a sustainable life based on wind and solar power. This transition is possible and we can defeat dirty coal. I have seen it done myself! Flagstaff, Arizona
John B. said...

For thirty years, I have fought the use and mining of coal in my region because that region became the largest concentration of coal plants in the world. As a result, a kid in Evansville, IN is five times more likely to be hospitalized with asthma than his counterpart in Ft. Wayne, IN which has similar demographics but no nearby coal plants. Coal has also devastated the regional economy and environment, leaving a legacy of waste and illness while stripping communities of their pride. Even though billions of dollars have been invested in this region in coal plants and mines, the area continues to be depressed economically just like every other coal community in the world. When you stake your future on coal, you get nothing but pollution and ill health in return. Evansville, Indiana
Kimberly S. said...

To me, it is so important to protect our natural air purifiers, the trees. Not only are they beautiful, they are the answer to all living things...they purify the air, they provide safe haven for all species, they keep us grounded, providing the much needed erosion control, and they lend life to the very humans who destroy them. Please, let us begin renewable free energy and save our lands. Macomb, Illinois
JP K. said...

I want to move beyond coal because I'm sick of the dirty politics, shady dealings and eradication of the mountains and prairies by the coal industry.
Paul W. said...

While coal was the important fuel for the industrial revolution and helped us be a great industrial power during WWII, we now need a clean energy revolution. Hopefully, very soon, before All Heaven West Virginia becomes Almost Level West Virginia.
Don F. said...

Our natural environment and resources are a key part of what we value. Why we would we want to desecrate landscapes so we can burn dirty fuel that destroys the air, waters, and land that nurtures and sustains us? Madison, Wisconsin
Will R. said...

I want to keep enjoying the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and other natural areas, without needing to worry about coal pollution damaging plant life, reducing visibility, and creating hazardous air quality conditions for hikers like me who have asthma. Springfield, Illinois
Charles B. said...

I've driven through an appalachian coal town. I stopped overnight and could barely breathe the next few days. No one should have to live in a place like that.
Roger D. said...

My morning paper announced intentions of my power company to seek a rate increase. The revenue would be spent to build new coal and nuclear capacity and new powerlines to import "coal by wire". If I have to pay even a little more for my electricity, I want it to be for clean, green power. Fairfax, Virginia
Kathy M. said...

We live on the Great Lakes, one of the true 'wonders of the world'. We are the current guardians of these incredible resources. In order to keep our lakes, fish and adjoining ecosystems healthy, we must eradicate coal burning as a way of producing electricity. It is one of the main pollution producing activities that adds lead, mercury, flyash and other contaminents to our waterways. It's worked for the past 100 years, now it's time to move ahead to some cleaner energy sources. Bay City, Michigan
Dan F. said...

Because mining, shipping and burning coal is the 21st century equivalent to the 19th Century Slave trade and slave practice. As the Coal industry rationalizes cheap coal and denies the health and environmental costs, the slave industry rationalized cheap labor and denied the dehumanizing and mortal effects of slavery. As Coal divides communities and legislators with their lies and deceptions, slavery divided whole nations as the US fought a Civil War to end slavery. Both Coal and Slavery have viable alternatives that solve both issues. Midland, Michigan
Joe S. said...

If we want to survive as a species we have to stop coal. As an added benefit, the solution, renewable energy, just happens to be the best remedy for our ailing economy. Overland Park, Kansas
Janea L. said...

I want America to move beyond coal because I don't want to see another generation exposed to the health hazards of coal and get left behind while the rest of the world turns to green energy. Midland, Michigan
John K. said...

It makes little sense to follow the same path as the auto manufactures did with fossil fuel vehicles. If we continue to rely on coal as our primary source of power, we will be facing the same issues as our country is now subjected to with gas fueled cars. We need to reduce our power consumption, produce power through renewable sources such as wind, solar, and geothermal, and research other possible sources of renewable power. In our community, we need to develop local jobs through renewable energy sources rather than spending money on coal purchased in another part of the country. We have the manufactruring expertise, the abandoned facilities, and the Great Lakes shipping capacity to become a major producer of these renewable energy sources. Our local Community College and our University are already developing programs to train students in these fields. We should not continue to be held hostage for another 50 years or longer to coal produced power by building another plant which relies on fossil fuel. Our New President and other political figures have commited to developing renewable sources of energy production. Other countries have already realized that fossil fuel reliance is dangerous. Our local community and Consumers Power Company need to realize that continuing in the same manner as we have for 50 or more years will negatively affect our long term economic conditions.
Bill G. said...

There are defining moments in the history of a nation. An obstacle with seemingly insurmountable odds looms in its path. Coal is a main fuel of climate change and must be shut down-and rather quickly. While the outcome of the coal fight looked bleak at first, because of the size of the task, I felt I could not look myself in the mirror if I did not assist the Club as much as I could in taking on Big Coal. The Club and its alliles, in a span of a couple of years, have ground the coal permitting process to an almost halt which has given time for our government under new leadership to chart a path to a carbon-free tomorrow. Leavenworth, Kansas

150 Coal Plants Unplugged: 400 Million Tons of CO2 Prevented

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